Comments on Planned Eagle Roundup Needed

Comment Now to Stop Eagle Roundup of 550 more Mustangs The BLM plans to leave only 100 wild horses on 670,000 acres of public land in Nevada that Congress set-aside principally for their use.They are now proposing to roundup and remove 550 “excess” wild horses in yet another inhumane winter roundup is now planned to begin on February 14th. Please take time to comment now! Comments are due by January 27th (4:30pm EST). In Defense of Animals has set up an easy to use comment form, just be sure to submit your own comments. Read in-depth reporting on the BLM’s faulty analysis and numbers that just don’t add up in the Eagle Environmental Assessment on the American Herds Blog.  The Environmental Assessment is online here. Read Testimonials on wild horse and burro roundups from AWHPC here.

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15 Responses to “Comments on Planned Eagle Roundup Needed”

  1. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    WHAT ABOUT THE ANTELOPE VALLEY ROUND-UP THAT WAS POSTED EARLIER. DOES THAT STILL NEED TO BE COMMENTED ON?

    • Marilyn Wargo Says:

      Antelope Valley Comments Due Jan 27th
      January 14, 2010 by thecloudfoundation
      BLM seeks public comment on proposed Antelope Complex wild horse gather

      January 13, 2010 – By ThisIsReno – Photos added in, Courtesy The Cloud Foundation

      ELKO — The Wells and Schell Field Offices of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Elko and Ely District Offices are seeking public input for the preparation of a preliminary environmental assessment (EA) that will address the need to reduce wild horse populations to the appropriate management levels of 471 to 788 animals within the Antelope Complex of four herd management areas (HMAs) in northeastern Nevada. The BLM will accept comments until January 27, 2010. An additional opportunity for public comment will be available when the preliminary EA is released for public review.

      The Antelope Complex includes the Antelope, Antelope Valley, Goshute, and Spruce/Pequop HMAs. The EA will examine the need to remove 1,506 excess wild horses to improve rangeland health and to preserve the health of the wild horse herds in these areas.

      Antelope Valley Horses wait in 0 deg. temps in Dec 2007 roundup
      The proposed gather would be conducted later this summer or fall. The gather is needed to protect public rangeland from undue degradation caused by excessive numbers of wild horses and to protect herd health by insuring adequate forage resources are available. The post-gather population of 471 wild horses would represent the lower limit of the appropriate management level (AML) and should allow the herd to grow to the upper limit of 788 animals over a four-year period without the need for additional gathers to remove excess animals in the interim.

      “Jewel” a mare who collapsed in the 2007 winter roundup in Antelope Valley
      To lengthen the time before a future gather may be required, BLM is also considering the implementation of fertility control treatments and male-to-female ratio adjustments as part of this gather. Approximately 236 mares released may receive the fertility control vaccine.

      The BLM is seeking any information, data, analysis, issues or concerns about this proposed gather and removal of wild horses. Information and comments received by Jan. 27 will be used to develop the preliminary EA. Comments may be submitted in writing to: BLM Wells Field Office, Attention: Wells Field Office Manager, 3900 Idaho Street, Elko, NV 89801. For more information, contact Bruce Thompson, Wild Horse and Burro Specialist at (775) 753-0286.

      Antelope Valley Horses Dec 2007 Roundup

  2. Marilyn Wargo Says:

    Yes Louie, also by the 27th! mar

  3. T.A. Paxton Says:

    Better keep listing them. I’m losing count of which ones I’ve done and which I need to do. There are so many its making me dizzy! With all the troubles in the world, can’t they find anything better to do than roundup our wild horses?

  4. jan eaker Says:

    have signed and forwarded, will keep on til this stops,

  5. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    I’M NEVER QUITE SURE WHERE TO POST SO THAT I CONNECT–SENT EXCERPT FROM ELYSE’S MOST RECENT REPORT AND PICTURES OF THE PAINT STALLION ON TO O’REILLY AT FOX. SINCE BO DEREK WAS ON HIS SHOW AND TOLD OF THEIR FIGHT, IT SEEMED A GOOD PLACE TO CONTINUE SENDING INFO.

  6. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    YOU DO HAVE TO CHECK BACK ON THE NEWSPAPER COMMENTS. THE SNIPERS WILL TAKE A SHOT WHEN YOU’RE NOT THERE. THE PAPER THAT HAD THE ARTICLE TELLING OF THE SIERRA CLUB AND THE SAFARI CLUB SUPPORT OF THE CALICO ROUND-UP IS ONE. THERE IS A COMMENT TELLING OF THE HORSES (500) STARVING IN THE MID 1970s. THE PERSON BLAMES THE HORSES AND THE HORSE ADVOCATES FOR THE STARVATION OF THE HORSES, AS WELL AS THE ANTELOPE AND THE SAGE HEN IN THE GERLACH (NOT SURE I SPELLED THAT RIGHT) AREA. DOES ANYONE HAVE KNOWLEDGE OF THAT?

    • Marilyn Wargo Says:

      Louie, Maybe check with American Herds, WIld Horse (and Burro) Warriors, and the war Room (Willis Lamm) I am sure there i something on that. i have heard about it many times. We can see who else may know… mar

  7. Jan Says:

    some horses were rescued off a ranch in nevada for lack of care but these horses had been adopted frm the blm – thot they cked on adoptions better than that

    • Robin Bailey Says:

      Jan, when we adopted our oldest Mustang from the BLM in 2005 our “case worker” (for lack of a better word) said that they didn’t have enough manpower to conduct all compliance inspections at the 6 month mark. We kept in very close contact with her via email with pics and updates of our boy, and we were told they would waive the inspection for us based on just that. I have no idea why they didn’t check on these other horses. What concerns me is that it appears the BLM just wants them off their books and off their dime to support; what happens to them once they leave the adoption facility, the BLM seems not to care. Do you know if these horses that were rescued were still in the adoption process, or had the certificates of title already been issued? If no titles had been issued, they will go back to BLM is what I understand. But also, once in the adoption process, if the BLM takes them back, a future adopter will also have to qualify and go through the adoption proess – they cannot just be sold outright. That is what we were told by BLM. That should hopefully keep these horses out of killer buyer hands.

  8. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    I RESPONDED WITH A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS: HOW MANY CATTLE ON THE RANGE AT THAT TIME?–WAS WATER FENCED OFF? WHAT FOOD WOULD WILD HORSES CONSUME THAT WOULD TAKE AWAY FROM SAGE HENS? THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BROWSERS AND GRAZERS AND THERE ARE CURRENTLY MORE PRONGHORNED ANTELOPE IN NEVADA THAN THERE ARE WILD HORSES. THEY ARE ALL WATCHING THIS ON THAT NEWSPAPER BLOG. WE ALSO NEED TO STATE THAT WE ARE ASKING FOR A “IN THE WILD” MANAGEMENT PROGRAM–RIGHT?

  9. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    SOME OF THE SNIPERS REALLY DON’T WARRANT TIME SPENT IN DEBATE–THEY SEEM TO JUST WANT TO BE ON THE MAP–BUT THERE ARE OTHERS READING AND THEY NEED TO SEE THE TRUTH AND SITES TO GO TO FIND IT FOR THEMSELVES.

  10. kas0859ohio Says:

    I agree with LOUIS- I am having trouble keeping track of what I’m doing. Can TFC post links here so we can link directly to each of the roundups (comments) that need are attention?

  11. LOUIE COCROFT Says:

    ME TOO–I’VE COLLECTED A MOUNTAIN OF DATA.

  12. Marilyn Wargo Says:

    I have put up the Cloud Post and the BLM page for Antelope… Does anyone have have the EMAIL address for the Antelope Comments since nothing else will get there on time?? Is it the same as Eagle for email?? Can someone find out? Mar

    Release Date: 01/13/10
    Contacts: Bruce Thompson , Wild Horse and Burro Specialist , 775-753-0286
    News Release No. 2010-11

    BLM Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Antelope Complex Wild Horse Gather

    Elko, Nev. — The Wells and Schell Field Offices of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Elko and Ely District Offices are seeking public input for the preparation of a preliminary environmental assessment (EA) that will address the need to reduce wild horse populations to the appropriate management levels of 471 to 788 animals within the Antelope Complex of four herd management areas (HMAs) in northeastern Nevada. The BLM will accept comments until January 27, 2010. An additional opportunity for public comment will be available when the preliminary EA is released for public review.

    The Antelope Complex includes the Antelope, Antelope Valley, Goshute, and Spruce/Pequop HMAs. The EA will examine the need to remove 1,506 excess wild horses to improve rangeland health and to preserve the health of the wild horse herds in these areas.

    The proposed gather would be conducted later this summer or fall. The gather is needed to protect public rangeland from undue degradation caused by excessive numbers of wild horses and to protect herd health by insuring adequate forage resources are available. The post-gather population of 471 wild horses would represent the lower limit of the appropriate management level (AML) and should allow the herd to grow to the upper limit of 788 animals over a four-year period without the need for additional gathers to remove excess animals in the interim.

    To lengthen the time before a future gather may be required, BLM is also considering the implementation of fertility control treatments and male-to-female ratio adjustments as part of this gather. Approximately 236 mares released may receive the fertility control vaccine.

    The BLM is seeking any information, data, analysis, issues or concerns about this proposed gather and removal of wild horses. Information and comments received by Jan. 27 will be used to develop the preliminary EA. Comments may be submitted in writing to: BLM Wells Field Office, Attention: Wells Field Office Manager, 3900 Idaho Street, Elko, NV 89801. For more information, contact Bruce Thompson, Wild Horse and Burro Specialist at 775-753-0286.

    The BLM manages more land – 253 million acres – than any other Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The Bureau, with a budget of about $1 billion, also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM’s multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by conserving natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands.

    –BLM–
    Elko District Office 3900 East Idaho Street Elko, NV 89801

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